The legend of the Ti Leaf

The legend of the Ti Leaf

Posted by : Mary Wutz   /  


The Ti Plant is seen all throughout Hawaii and is a large part of the Hawaiian tradition and culture. The Ti Plant was brought to the islands by the Polynesians, who considered them to have divine power. In Hawaiian culture, Ti Leaves are sacred to Lono, the Hawaiian God of fertility and Laka, the Goddess of Hula. The leaves have been used by the Kahuna priests in their religious ceremonies as a protection to ward off evil spirits and bring in good.

Ti plants were used in many ways by ancient Hawaiians. They used to be baked and eaten as a dessert. They also used the ti plants medically. When boiled, Hawaiians were known for drinking the water to aid nerve and muscle relaxation. They were also used to wrap around hot stones to use as a hot pack. Ti plants were also used to create roofs, plates, cups, and rain capes.

Today, Hawaiians still use Ti Plants from the leaf to the it’s roots.  Hawaiians also believe that planting Ti Plants around their homes bring good luck into the house. Ti leaves are worn either in the form of leis, hula skirts, or as a necklace to worn off evil spirits. Some Hawaiians are even known for carrying a single leaf around with them just for extra luck.

As well as bringing good luck, Ti Leaves are also known for having a very intense spiritual energy. While practicing meditation, it has been known to collect 4 (the number 4 is known to be sacred by Hawaiians) Ti Leaves, to bring a sense of resting. The ti leaf is a very versatile plant and is sacred to Hawaiian culture.

To learn more about the Ti leaf and learn how to construct a ti leaf cape visit The Ti Plant Called Ki  

Photo from Making Ti Leaf Leis

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